Maltodextrin

Maltodextrin

What is maltodextrin?

Maltodextrin is an oligosaccharide composed by a maximum of seventeen chains of dextrose molecules, linked with alpha-glycosidic bonds. It is a kind of glucose that can enzymatically be derived from any starch, generally corn and wheat. The enzymes break the glucose chains in the starch molecules into shorter untis, similar to the process of digestion in the human body.

Maltodextrin is an artificial sugar (also known as a polysaccharide) that has a mild, sweet taste. One type of thismaltodextrin oligosaccharide is a simple carbohydrate. It contains calories and is used in supplements designed to provide a boost of energy. The second type -- resistant maltodextrin -- comes from the same source, but it goes through additional processing to make it indigestible. This resistant type doesn’t provide energy, but it does deliver benefits similar to soluble fiber's. It is produced by using enzymes or acids to break down starches like corn, potatoes and rice into smaller pieces. The end result is a white powder that is easily digested. When it’s added to foods, maltodextrin thickens the product, prevents crystallization and helps bind ingredients together.